Asia

By  
Deepali Srivastava
November 6, 2017
History records that when Mahatma Gandhi raised a handful of salt in 1930, he shook the mighty British Empire. But history, as we know it,...
By  
John F. McCreary
August 14, 2017
With White House staff endeavoring to walk back President Trump's bombast about "fire and fury like the world has never seen,"...
By  
Jane Wong
August 9, 2017
On the cover of The Poems of Kim Yideum, Kim Haengsook, and Kim Min Jeong —new writing by Korean women poets from Vagabond Press’s Asia...
By  
Deepali Srivastava
May 11, 2017
At the Lahore Literary Festival held at the Asia Society, New York on May 6, Pakistani journalist and author Raza Rumi led a minute of...
By  
Varsha Dutta
January 4, 2017
Chicken mnemonics The old man squats through unhung chimney Bellows out a copper cloud it chokes up the stench From the neighbor’s farm In...
By  
Matthew Shutzer
November 29, 2016
It’s not just repressive policing that connects climate struggles, but global policy frameworks that have privatized the earth’s resources...
By  
Ikram Ullah
November 28, 2016
It has been 141 days since Kashmiris have stood up, most recently, against the tyranny of the Indian occupation in Kashmir. We have faced...
By  
Suchitra Vijayan
October 24, 2016
“Auschwitz is outside of us, but it is all around us, in the air. The plague has died away, but the infection still lingers, and it would...
By  
Ather Zia
September 29, 2016
An exemplar image of what I am about to say appears thus. Kashmiri men, some are running and some climbing on an armored truck, which holds...
By  
Deepali Srivastava
September 8, 2016
Amitav Ghosh’s latest non-fiction The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable sets him apart from writers like Naomi Klein...
By  
Kashmir Scholars Action Group
September 1, 2016
Mr. Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Palais...
By  
Stephen Byrne, Chandra Gurung
August 29, 2016
RULERS AND SHOES by Chandra Gurang The rulers, Covering their filthy feet With different design of shoes Feel secure. The shoes also Having...
By  
Riyaz Wani
August 10, 2016
As Kashmir tips into turmoil following the death of the popular militant commander Burhan Wani, a new angry Kashmiri generation has taken...
By  
Masarat Alam
August 1, 2016
Masarat Alam, one of the most influential separatist leaders in Kashmir, was in prison on July 8th, when the current wave of deadly clashes...
By  
Preethi Nallu
July 23, 2016
Over the first week of July, Mr. and Mrs. Hyder Ghulam Bhat were confronted with a difficult decision. They had to call off their daughter'...
By  
Steve Shaw
July 11, 2016
President Xi Jinping’s state visit to the United Kingdom in October 2015 was a landmark moment for the country’s relationship with China...
By  
Flavio Rizzo
June 14, 2016
Nothing in the cry of cicadas suggests they are about to die -Matsuo Bashō After years of self-imposed isolation, literally having never...
By  
Nooreen Reza
June 8, 2016
Last month a video surfaced online of Pakistan army officers in the country's Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) that caused...
By  
Madiha Tahir
June 4, 2016
In a recent think piece “Drone blowback in Pakistan is a myth. Here’s why”, political scientist Aqil Shah argues that blowback from...
By  
Laura Cesaretti
April 18, 2016
Graffiti on the walls of a high school in Afghanistan’s Achin district, some 10km from the Pakistani border, reads: “Islamic Governorate of...
By  
Preethi Nallu
April 12, 2016
In 2015, more than 200,000 Afghans arrived in Europe fleeing violence in search of greater economic opportunity and better living...
By  
Majid Maqbool
April 7, 2016
In 2012, when the brutal gang rape of a 23-year-old medical student in New Delhi led to widespread protests and outrage across India, in...
By  
Tim LaRocco
March 22, 2016
“Yuon is the name given by Kampuchea's people to the Vietnamese since the epoch of Angkor and it means 'savage,’” wrote Saloth Sar,...
By  
Preethi Nallu
March 15, 2016
For decades the running joke in Myanmar, known as Burma until 1989, was that George Orwell crafted his novel 1984 based on his personal...
By  
Steve Shaw
March 1, 2016
As Tibetans prepare for the 57th anniversary of the Tibetan Uprising, Chinese authorities have sealed the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) to...
By  
Inshah Malik
February 22, 2016
During the 1980s, Mohammad Afzal Guru dropped out of his medical degree program and crossed over the Line of Control into Pakistan-...
By  
Warscapes
February 7, 2016
The Jaipur Literary Festival is the largest free festival of its kind in the world, featuring critically-acclaimed writers representing...
By  
Saligrama K. Aithal
February 5, 2016
Author's Preface What is truth? Who can tell what happened and why? These are questions we confront everyday of our lives, particularly in...
By  
Preethi Nallu
December 16, 2015
Gandhi famously quipped that when a woman can walk without fear on a midnight street, India would have truly achieved independence. In the...
By  
Fatima Raza
December 13, 2015
On November 11, roughly 10,000 people spilled into the streets of Kabul, Afghanistan, to protest the killing of members of the Hazara...
By  
Pranav Kohli
December 9, 2015
The sixth volume of the Sternberg Critical Spatial Practice series, Eyal Weizman’s The Roundabout Revolutions examines the recent trend of...
By  
Elsa Marie D’Silva
December 6, 2015
“Groped in a train between Bandra and Dadar. First class compartment.” - Mumbai “I was going to Shahdara metro station. On the way a man...
By  
Sinthujan Varatharajah
November 28, 2015
MIA released her latest video "Borders" recently and caused, as she so often does, an Internet uproar. Her self-directed video is a visual...
By  
Shirin Bismillah
November 23, 2015
Editor’s Introduction Shirin Bismallah’s poems are disarming. The language enfolds, protects, we might say, the consciousness inside the...
By  
Sai Aw
November 7, 2015
On November 8, Burma will vote in the first competitive election in a generation. Yet these polls have been widely described as flawed ,...
By  
Francesca Recchia
November 4, 2015
Malik Sajad was born in Srinagar, the summer capital of Indian-occupied Kashmir, in 1987. Munnu: A Boy From Kashmir is his first book-...
By  
Asiya Haouchine
October 30, 2015
“You cannot shake hands with a clenched fist”—Indira Gandhi Two of her own bodyguards assassinated the first female Prime Minister of India...
By  
Michael Bronner
October 23, 2015
In an extraordinary public statement on live television earlier this week, on the eve of Pakistani Prime Miniser Nawaz Sharif’s visit to...
By  
Sally Kantar
October 22, 2015
Bangkok’s little-known population of Pakistani asylum seekers uses community action to respond to the challenges facing refugees without a...
By  
Pranav Kohli
September 24, 2015
This is a race critical review of the BBC documentary India’s Daughter . It seeks to examine the orientalism inherent in this documentary’s...
By  
Fathima Cader
August 14, 2015
Sri Lanka, 2009: Reflections on Eastern Muslim Survival at the Close of the War May 2009 marked the end of nearly thirty years of civil war...
By  
Luke Hunt
July 22, 2015
Naval brinkmanship in the South China Sea is taking a backseat to diplomacy, trade and the international courts. For the time being at...
By  
Arpita Mandal
July 6, 2015
The Indian novels written in English that Western readers are most familiar with have been referred to as “the sari and mango novels” by...
By  
July 3, 2015
“Our thoughts, feelings, desires and actions are being robotized; 'life' is coming to mean feeding apparatuses and being fed by them. In...
By  
Michael Hayes
June 16, 2015
KOH TANG island, Cambodia: The last chapter of America's tragic involvement in the Vietnam War took place on this pristine, tropical island...
By  
Kevin Minh Allen
April 30, 2015
It took me 41 years and four months to return to the city in which I was born in December 1973. Sài Gòn, Việt Nam, is a city that no longer...
By  
Manash Bhattacharjee
April 17, 2015
Author's Introduction: Babasaheb Ambedkar (14 April 1891 – 6 December 1956), was a man of many talents: a jurist, a critical scholar of...
By  
Syed Sami Raza and BS Hons. Students
April 10, 2015
When people in the US and Europe think of Peshawar, Pakistan, they perceive it as a hub of religiosity and extremism. Such a perception is...
By  
Arpita Mandal
April 8, 2015
Rafia Zakaria is a Jill of many trades, serving as an attorney, a human rights activist, a columnist, and an author. Her interests are...
By  
Sinthujan Varatharajah
March 21, 2015
Last month, the Northern Provincial Council (NPC) of Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka’s only Tamil-led provincial council, passed a resolution accusing...
By  
Arpita Appannagari and Caritas Doha
March 12, 2015
This International Women’s Day marked the beginning of a large-scale campaign to eradicate gender inequality and end violence against women...
By  
Luke Hunt
March 9, 2015
PHNOM PENH — Marathon efforts to prosecute Pol Pot's surviving henchmen have never been short on controversy. "Too late," "too long," and "...
By  
Suchitra Vijayan
March 5, 2015
Introducing the Warscapes Public Lecture Series War does not exist in a vacuum. At Warscapes, we work to move past a void within mainstream...
By  
Deepali Srivastava
February 13, 2015
When the going gets tough, they say, the tough get going. And gone is the tough Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Bharatiya Janata...
By  
Khem K. Aryal
February 3, 2015
The Maoist rebels entered Khaireni after dinnertime. The dim filament lights that dangled from veranda roofs turned off one by one as the...
By  
Warscapes
January 30, 2015
The Jaipur Literature Festival boasts the privilege of being the largest free literary festival in the world. Founded in 2006, the festival...
By  
Jyoti Omi Chowdhury
January 24, 2015
When the United States first ratified the Geneva Conventions in 1955, the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations categorized the agreements...
By  
Belén Fernández
January 7, 2015
Back in 2004, George W. Bush voiced his conviction that “[n]o President has ever done more for human rights than I have.” This is the same...
By  
Sally Kantar and Suracheth Prommarak
December 25, 2014
There was a time when Moken robbed Moken , the villagers of Thailand’s Koh Phayam remember quietly. Known as Southeast Asia’s people of the...
By  
Sinthujan Varatharajah
December 16, 2014
“Serendipity Revealed” is an exhibition of modern art from Sri Lanka currently showing at Brunei Gallery in the heart of London. It is an...
By  
Jane Wong
November 18, 2014
The winner of the 2012 Kundiman Prize, Split is Cathy Linh Che’s debut collection of poetry. Split unflinchingly delves into trauma,...
By  
Samina Najmi
November 12, 2014
Was I ever young enough to want to go out on New Year’s Eve? Or even to want to just stay up until midnight so that the new year wouldn’t...
By  
Bhakti Shringarpure
October 26, 2014
When my brother, his partner, and I decided to catch a late night show of Haider , a film adaptation of Shakespeare’s Hamlet set in Kashmir...
By  
Ayesha Pervez
October 15, 2014
Tales of repression and subjugation are ubiquitous in the military-ruled northernmost borderland of India, the state of Jammu and Kashmir...
By  
Sumana Roy
October 6, 2014
Houses in small towns have strange nicknames. My parents' house, for instance, is known to the residents of the locality as White House –...
By  
Saiba Varma
September 9, 2014
On Tuesday, September 1, the rains came. By the next day, much of the city of Srinagar in the Indian-controlled region of Jammu and Kashmir...
By  
Shrimoyee Nandini Ghosh
September 9, 2014
10 May 2014, Saturday It is two days after the parliamentary elections in North Kasmir. There has been stone-throwing in Sopore, and many...
By  
Jason Huettner
August 13, 2014
Fashion's penchant for glamorizing horrible things reached new lows this week. Mumbai fashion photographer Raj Shetye's latest series,...
By  
August 6, 2014
Going unnoticed is one of the happy thrills of being small. The adjectives arrive in four letter words: tiny, puny, the like. When one is...
By  
Laura Costello
July 31, 2014
Comics are bigger than ever, both in our mainstream pop culture and in the world of literature, literary criticism and academia. As someone...
By  
Priyanka Dass Saharia
July 24, 2014
Originally published in Countercurrents . Bihurama Ganju, a resident of Gurunjuli village along the Assam-Arunchal border, was beaten to...
By  
July 23, 2014
It’s a white building in a city of brown and gray. The mausoleum of the founder of Pakistan, Mohammad Ali Jinnah, is made of white marble...
By  
Suchitra Vijayan
June 13, 2014
Almost two weeks ago, I saw the image of two young girls suspended from the mango tree. It was a macabre image full of agony. Men, women...
By  
John F. McCreary
June 11, 2014
Today, an Iraqi interior ministry official said, "The city of Mosul is outside the control of the state and at the mercy of the militants...
By  
Jason Huettner
June 10, 2014
The recent rape and murder of two teenage girls from Katra Saadatganj, Budaun district in north India has sparked shock and outrage across...
By  
June 8, 2014
If money really grew on trees, most people in the world would have worked towards being good gardeners. And yet I find myself surrounded by...
By  
Prakash Joshi
June 1, 2014
At the time of gloaming on the evening of 18 May 2014, Narendra Modi, the then Prime Minister-to-be of India spoke into the microphone on...
By  
Madiha Kark
May 29, 2014
The Palestine Festival of Literature (PalFest) now in its sixth year has been successful in portraying a part of Palestinian culture rarely...
By  
Grace Jung
May 21, 2014
In his contribution to The New York Times Op-Ed column, Korean novelist Kim Young-ha writes : “[Suicide is] the No.1 cause of death for...
By  
Vera Kiss
May 21, 2014
Although Burmese President Thein Sein has initiated a series of democratic changes that the international world optimistically welcomed,...
By  
Geoff Wisner
May 19, 2014
The Wind Rises is the latest animated film by the Japanese director Hayao Miyazaki, the 73-year-old creator of such classic works as...
By  
Franco Galdini
May 13, 2014
“My sister didn’t give her consent. Girls are just stolen like livestock." (1) “My kidnapping case changed my attitude towards many things...
By  
Suchitra Vijayan
May 7, 2014
Violence founds and preserves the state. Monopoly over the legal use of violence is, Max Weber reminds us, indispensable to all modern...
By  
Belén Fernández
April 26, 2014
When the US was initially up in arms over the use of chemical weapons in Syria , various commentators pointed out the hypocrisy of the...
By  
Ahsan Sayed
April 25, 2014
On April 23, 2013, in a large eight story building on the outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladeshis rushed from shops and banks on the lowers floors...
By  
Vinh Nguyen
April 24, 2014
Jeet Thayil’s novel Narcopolis begins and ends with Bombay. The opening lines declare the city as the main “heroin” of the story, revealing...
By  
Tim LaRocco
April 22, 2014
A few weeks ago, I detailed the issue of nationalist politics and ethnic identity in Cambodia. In the wake of this past summer’s elections...
By  
March 30, 2014
I was not in Kabul in 1996. That was the last time the Taliban marched into a city, the last time the world was not watching, the last time...
By  
Louise Harrington
March 24, 2014
In a novel that spans over fifty years and crosses borders from India to America to Ireland, Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Lowland weaves an...
By  
Bhakti Shringarpure
March 18, 2014
The past year and a half has been a volatile one for India, starting with a violent gang rape case in December 2012 that rocked the nation...
By  
Tim LaRocco
March 15, 2014
Sam Rainsy’s recent long-winded editorial in the Phnom Penh Post lamenting the negative connotations affixed to the word “yuon,” the Khmer...
By  
Suchitra Vijayan
March 12, 2014
Dr B.R. Ambedkar was an Indian revolutionary, a statesman, a scholar, a visionary, a civil rights activist, a political leader and a jurist...
By  
Vikram Zutshi
March 6, 2014
March 5, 2011: The Fire Hollowed eyes. Glazed looks. Disoriented and displaced in their own neighborhood. Wandering aimlessly. Clutching at...
By  
By Anuradha Sharma Pujari
February 5, 2014
Translator's Preface “Surrender” is a dark and complex depiction of the life of Dipok, a former militant who has left his organization and...
By  
Feroz Rather
February 5, 2014
As Ilham awoke, he sat up. To his right Showket lay on the edge of the mattress, his eyes half closed and genies of sleep lingering over...
By  
Easterine Kire
February 5, 2014
Preface Set in 2007, around six decades after a rebellion burst out against Indian rule in the Northeast Indian state of Nagaland, this is...
By  
Omair Ahmed
February 5, 2014
Foreword Omair Ahmed's book Jimmy the Terrorist was shortlisted for the 2009 Man Asian Literary Prize. However, it was in this short story...
By  
Meena Alexander
February 5, 2014
Foreword Meena Alexander’s novel Nampally Road takes place in the city of Hyderabad amidst unrest and opposition to Chief Minister Limca...
By  
Asim Rafiqui
February 5, 2014
This essay is excerpted from a multimedia web project titled, The Idea of India , which photographer and writer Asim Rafiqui describes as...
By  
Raktim Sarma
February 5, 2014
Translator’s Preface Raktim Sarma was a former junior commissioned officer of the ULFA (United Liberation Front of Assam), the most visible...
By  
Saiba Varma
February 5, 2014
The Kashmir valley experienced a painful, ultimately unsuccessful armed movement for self-determination against Indian rule from 1988-2002...
By  
Jane Wong
February 4, 2014
In his debut collection of poems Topaz , Brian Komei Dempster writes: “I feel war’s incision.” These poems cut open the past line by line,...
By  
Aaron Rubin
December 13, 2013
Audiences will notice that the most striking aspect of Nagieb Khaja's new film, My Afghanistan: Life in the Forbidden Zone , is how...
By  
Feroz Rather
November 23, 2013
Nov 17, 2013: For past one week, I’ve been staying aloof in my Delhi apartment, gloomily musing about the latent flames within a writer...
By  
Asim Rafiqui
October 15, 2013
One evening, standing on a hill overlooking Paizoo Khan's small mud house located close to the Afghan border, I was struck by the...
By  
Jane Wong
October 2, 2013
Mai Ei, one of the fifteen poets featured in Bones Will Crow: An Anthology of Burmese Poetry , writes in “A Letter for Lovers and Haters...
By  
Michael Busch
October 1, 2013
The most significant art exhibit on view in New York at the moment is “Iran Modern,” a beautifully curated show that opened recently at the...
By  
Mark Sauter
September 10, 2013
When 1st Lt. Gilbert Lamour Ashley – nicknamed “Coogs” after movie star Jackie Coogan – disappeared in January 1953 with more than a dozen...
By  
Rafia Zakaria
June 25, 2013
Karachi is hot in April, searing and unbearably scorching. It is so hot that the plastic consoles inside cars melt; the backs of shirts are...
By  
Beverly Parayno
June 18, 2013
Author's Preface This story takes places at the end of the Japanese occupation of the Philippines during World War II in a small town...
By  
Matthew Ross
May 8, 2013
In her new book In the Shadow of the Greatest Generation: The Americans Who Fought the Korean War, Melinda L. Pash seeks nothing less than...
By  
Majid Maqbool
April 29, 2013
On a cold December afternoon in Srinagar a group of Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) personnel were busy picking up bricks and throwing...
By  
Merlin Ural
March 31, 2013
“Whosoever chooses to follow guidance, follows it for his own good; whosoever goes astray, goes astray to his own loss.” – Qur’an, Sura Al-...
By  
Sabahat Chaudhary
March 25, 2013
When I was in college, an older friend who frequented the café where I worked recommended I read a certain classic self-help book. Now, I...
By  
Alizah Salario
March 23, 2013
It would be easy to write Anwar Congo off as a brutal, merciless, and corrupt mass murderer and relegate him to the corner of history...
By  
Wing Tek Lum
March 23, 2013
Editor's Preface In the standard Western narrative, World War 2 began on September 3, 1939, when the inchoate Allied Powers invaded...
By  
Photo essay by Saiful Huq Omi
March 15, 2013
Editor's Preface The 1982 Citizenship Law of Burma legally recognizes 135 ethnic groups as lawful citizens. Not included among them are as...
By  
Aruni Kashyap
March 7, 2013
Neerumoni was the first one in the family to suspect that those books were the reason behind all those sounds and strange incidents. Anil...
By  
Kate Bartlett
February 1, 2013
One night, during a recent reporting trip to Afghanistan, I was one of a few non-military personnel, and one of even fewer women, to attend...
By  
Srila Roy
January 28, 2013
Rape is not exceptional but routine in most parts of the world. The fact that a twenty-three-year-old student, Jyoti, was brutally gang...
By  
Jacob Dee Lauritzen
December 13, 2012
Globalization, while retaining the veneer that it brings communities and nations together also threatens our identities as individuals and...
By  
Sumana Roy
October 9, 2012
At all times, a student’s life is most difficult: the war-like attention to details during exams, the guilt of failing to wake up at six...
By  
Flavio Rizzo
October 3, 2012
Every structure is organized on acts of exclusion but what is repressed and excluded does not disappear but always returns to unsettle...
By  
Daniel Chung
September 25, 2012
The sixth film from American writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson, The Maste r tracks Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), an animalistic,...
By  
ko ko thett
September 17, 2012
urban renewal double it or nothing, you and your hybridism your face needs to be lifted, the sprawl beyond your subconscious needs to be...
By  
Zésopol Carlito Caminha
July 18, 2012
In May 2012, Timor-Leste celebrated its ten-year anniversary of the restoration of independence after a brutal occupation under Indonesian...
By  
Sitor Situmorang
July 15, 2012
Sitor Situmorang is an award-winning poet, essayist and writer of short stories from Indonesia. Born in 1924 and active as a journalist in...
By  
Pramoedya Ananta Toer
July 8, 2012
Click here for the author's biography and a literary context. Translated by John H. McGlynn (aka Willem Samuels) When I was growing up, my...
By  
John McGlynn
July 8, 2012
Click here to read 'In Twilight Born,' a short story by Pramoedya Ananta Toer For the larger part of his writing career, Indonesian author...
By  
Rachael Johnson
July 5, 2012
The Chinese writer Liu Xiaobo has inhabited many roles throughout his life. He has been a poet, essayist, academic, public intellectual and...
By  
Vikram Odedra Kolmannskog
June 22, 2012
I got out of bed, showered quickly and put on a white sherwani suit that my cousin had brought from Leicester especially for the occasion...
By  
Flavio Rizzo
May 29, 2012
"The impact of art is not instantaneous. Art needs people who need art. There is a give and take. There's an exchange. If the society needs...
By  
Feroz Rather
May 29, 2012
Is it possible to write about someone whom you have never met or seen or touched or listened to? Is it possible to write about someone I...
By  
Khet Mar
May 2, 2012
This poem was written right after Burma granted national amnesty to political prisoners on January 13, 2012. Khet Mar explains, "Many of my...
By  
Tibita Kaneene
April 17, 2012
The Island President , a documentary that tells the story of President Mohamed Nasheed of the Maldives, arrives in theaters just a few...
By  
Jacob Dee Lauritzen
April 3, 2012
Two years a ago, the New York Times printed a short article announcing that First Second Books would be publishing a web comic “about Iran...
By  
Lina Mounzer
March 19, 2012
Obsessed, bewildered By the shipwreck Of the singular We have chosen the meaning Of being numerous. - George Oppen, 1908-1984 Prologue The...
By  
Khet Mar
February 6, 2012
The short story Night Flow was published in Perfect magazine in 2008 in Burma and some of the sections were censored. Written during the...
By  
Tibita Kaneene
February 1, 2012
A Separation is a gripping family and legal drama written and directed by Asghar Farhadi that stands as one of the best films released in...
By  
Bhakti Shringarpure
January 9, 2012
Bhakti Shringarpure: Do give us some political and personal context with regards to your novel Traitor. Shobasakthi: On July 25, 1983, the...
By  
Shobasakthi (translation by Anushiya Ramaswamy)
January 9, 2012
Click here for Shobasakthi in conversation with Warscapes on Sri Lanka, the situation of Tamils and being a refugee writer... From the...
By  
Arif Ayaz Parrey
January 1, 2012
Our Mohalla clings to the Jhelum at the far-end of the town, bound on the other side by the bypass road of the main highway of the region...
By  
Elizabeth D. Herman
December 16, 2011
Apni amar meye , Rabeya Khatun says as she presses me in a tight embrace. You are my daughter. I had met Rabeya only an hour and a half ago...
By  
Aparajita Saha-Bubna
December 15, 2011
In her new book, historian Yasmin Saikia serves up some bitter medicine. And there's no spoonful of sugar at the end to ease the aftertaste...
By  
Anne Nivat
November 6, 2011
This chapter is the last in Anne Nivat’s new book, Fog of War: A Last Mission in Afghanistan . The preceding chapters recall her journeys...
By  
Madeleine Thien
November 2, 2011
Aranyaprathet smells of overripe pineapples and mangy dogs. Beside Hiroji's guesthouse, a woman tries to sell him Buddha heads. She tugs at...