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  • Texbook Racism; a canon of division in Israeli education

    Nurit Peled-Elhanan Ambreen Agha

    Nurit Peled-Elhanan is an Israeli academic, activist, and a laureate of the Sakharov Prize for Human Rights and the Freedom of Thought awarded by the European Parliament.

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  • Slow-Motion "Social Death" in the Kashmir Valley

    Preethi Nallu

    Over the first week of July, Mr. and Mrs. Hyder Ghulam Bhat were confronted with a difficult decision. They had to call off their daughter's wedding. 

    "We regret to inform that due to prevailing circumstances in the Valley, the marriage ceremony of our daughter is hereby postponed," their announcement in the local paper read.

    The "prevailing circumstances" referred to deadly fighting that broke out on July 8 in the Indian administered part of Kashmir, where they live.

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  • The Guantánamo Diarist is Cleared for Release!

    Michael Bronner

    “What do you mean by ‘tea and sugar?’” the American interrogators wanted to know.

    Armed with an intelligence phone intercept in which the phrase “tea and sugar” was uttered by a then-30-something Mauritanian electrical engineer named Mohamedou Ould Slahi during a conversation with a friend, the military intelligence officers – who now had Slahi shackled to the floor in a wooden hutch at Guantánamo – were convinced he was speaking in code, “tea and sugar” some sort of encrypted directives in a terrorist plot.

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  • One Step Closer to Justice in El Salvador

    Michael Busch

    Yesterday afternoon, El Salvador’s Supreme Court issued a landmark ruling that could change the face of justice in the country. The court found a 1993 amnesty law—which blocks investigations and prosecutions of crimes committed during El Salvador’s civil war—to be unconstitutional.

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  • Peace, Infrastructure and Politics in Colombia

    Paola Chaves and Fabio Andrés Díaz

    The historic bi-lateral ceasefire recently signed by the Colombian government and the FARC seems to consolidate the possibility of a final agreement that will end the conflict. This is a momentous occasion. It demonstrates that conflict with the FARC and the carnage it produced in Colombia over the past six decades can be ended.

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  • Independence Day

    Edward Eremugo Luka

    After being a refugee for five years, Johnny returns to Juba, South Sudan on the day of its independence. But his homecoming is marred by the new bittersweet realities plaguing the world’s youngest country. 

    July 7, 2011. 10.10am

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  • China's Darkest Moment

    Steve Shaw

    President Xi Jinping’s state visit to the United Kingdom in October 2015 was a landmark moment for the country’s relationship with China. It marked the first time a Chinese president had visited the UK in a decade, and resulted in business deals estimated to be worth almost £40 billion. The UK’s Conservative government described the visit as a “golden era” for relations and showed itself to be one of China’s closest friends in the West.

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  • Challenging the White Gaze: Refresh, Reboot, Rewrite Africa

    Hassan Ghedi Santur

    For over a week, social media has been ablaze thanks to a memoir written by a Scottish actress by the name of Louise Linton. It all started on July 1st when an excerpt from her memoir called “How my dream gap year in Africa turned into a nightmare” was published in the lifestyle section of The Telegraph. 

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  • Imaginative geographies of Algeria's dark decade

    Kai Krienke

    In an interview given to Le Monde in 2010, Algerian historian Mohammed Harbi declared that “[s]ince [Algerian] independence, history is under surveillance.” Although he was speaking in the specific context of Franco-Algerian history, Harbi’s remarks have particular relevance to the decade-long civil war that claimed between 100,000 and 200,000 lives from 1992-2002, and to the history that remains silenced to this day.

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  • The Representation of the Syrian Revolution in Literature

    Mohammed Kadalah

    It was a winter night when I sat in a café with four friends and heard on the news that Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, president of Tunisia, had fled to Saudi Arabia on January 14, 2011. It was a strange piece of news! We looked at one another, and all of us were thinking the same thing: ‘Could it happen in Syria?’ But nobody dared to say it out loud... After a few months, three of us were protesting and could not believe it was really us!

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