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  • The State and the Selfie: India and Slacktivism

    Suchitra Vijayan

    “Our thoughts, feelings, desires and actions are being robotized; 'life' is coming to mean feeding apparatuses and being fed by them. In short: Everything is becoming absurd. So where is there room for human freedom?”
                                 Towards a Philosophy of Photography, Vilém Flusser
     

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  • In Search of Truth: Perspectives on Fact-Checking

    David Schafer

    On June 29, the second day of the WARM Festival, the Foundation hosted a program entitled, “Fact Checking Challenges,” which featured an array of speakers from around the world discussing both the role of fact checking in conflict reporting and the technical challenges of fact-checking photos and videos. Separated into two discussions, experts noted the importance of not only getting the facts correct, but, on a deeper level, verifying images and claims made by interviewees.

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  • Why Policymakers Should Care About The FIFA Scandal

    Alex Lord

    If corruption of the best gives rise to the worst, as the saying goes, then the global village has some serious questions to ask about international sports. With the ever-growing popularity of worldwide sporting events, nations wishing to host them spend millions of dollars preparing bids to stage a glamorous and well-organized event. International competitions—like the Olympics—draw attention and participation of almost every nation in the world. Hosting is an honor, and countries use these events to showcase themselves as capable, and therefore, important nations.

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  • Tito’s Bunker – Remembering a Futuristic Past

    Clara Casagrande and Marion Pineau

    Located 50km southwest of Sarajevo in the town of Konjic, Tito’s bunker is one of the largest and best-kept State secrets of the former Yugoslavia. The construction, started in March 1953 upon Tito’s order, was done in total secrecy; not even the nearest neighbors knew about it. The teams of workers were replaced regularly so that no one would know too much about the bunker, and the workers were even transported there blindfolded so they wouldn’t know its exact location.

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  • Ordering History: Belfast's New Orange Museum

    Gareth Davies

    “…museums, and the museumizing imagination, are both profoundly political.” (Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities)

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  • Don’t blink, nothing’s changed: digital records of white supremacy

    Melissa Smyth

    In the week after Eric Casebolt of the McKinney Police Department provided backup for two women’s racist assaults on black teens enjoying an end-of-school pool party, I was reading Hilton Als’s collection of essays called White Girls.

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  • The "Values" of Mainstream Journalism: Shilling for the IDF

    Belén Fernández

    Last month, the New York Times published an article by Isabel Kershner that was not entirely distinguishable from an Israeli army press release.

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  • Remembering the Mayaguez Incident and Those Left Behind: 40 Years After

    Michael Hayes

    KOH TANG island, Cambodia: The last chapter of America's tragic involvement in the Vietnam War took place on this pristine, tropical island, although the book on what happened here still hasn't been closed. While most Americans might be hard-pressed to explain the Mayaguez incident, those who took part in the engagement say they will never forget it nor, more importantly, those they left behind.

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  • "Dougla" Politics

    Gaiutra Bahadur

    “Dougla” is a slur meaning “bastard” or “mutt.” It has its origins in Bhojpuri, the dialect of Hindi spoken by the majority of Indians who migrated as indentured laborers in the 19th and early 20th centuries. In North India, the word was used to describe someone with parents of different castes. It had the strong connotation of pollution, since orthodox Hinduism saw relationships across caste as illegitimate. In the Caribbean, the word was applied to the children of black and Indian parents. Its sting was no less in this transplanted setting.

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  • Architecture of impermanence: Notes from Palestine

    Francesca Recchia

    We arrive late, as the sun is going down. The warm light of dusk embraces the landscape and glistens on the white stone of the buildings. Ayat Alturshan is waiting for us in the plaza of the Al Fawwar refugee camp in the southern West Bank, not far from Hebron. Alturshan is a youth activist whose struggle for women's rights to public space has changed the face of the camp. Palestinian architect, Sandi Hilal, had told me about her previously. I was keen to meet her and hear her story.

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