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  • Triumphing Beyond Trump

    Sanober Umar

    Eight years ago, my mother and I cried as we watched on television our first Black President get elected. The day Donald Trump was elected, we had tears of a different kind. As Trump is sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, one thing that has been made clear for “colorblind” liberals is that there is no such thing as “post-racial America.”

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  • ICC Justice and the Trial Narrative

    Scott Ross

    “This trial is about the violence and misery that blighted the lives of millions of people living in northern Uganda.” This was how Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court Fatou Bensouda began her opening statements last month in the case against Dominic Ongwen, until recently a commander in the rebel Lord’s Resistance Army. To be sure, Ongwen’s trial at The Hague will address instances of terrible violence inflicted on the people of northern Uganda.

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  • Patrice Lumumba: Rare interview footage before his assassination

    Transcript coming soon...

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  • I want you blue and 3 other poems

    Varsha Dutta

    Chicken mnemonics

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  • Boubacar Traoré Creates Community Using The Language Of Blues

    Mary von Aue

    When Boubacar Traoré first achieved fame in the 1960s, it was tethered to a social responsibility. Hits like Mali Twist were immediately swept into the narrative of a joyous nation emerging from colonialism, but even the most frivolous-sounding dance beats were anchored in lyrics that called on Malians to transform their homeland. His songs were inescapable on the radio, blending American blues and classical Arabic melodies to create a new genre of West African blues.

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  • The Guantánamo Diarist's Hometown Tormentor

    Deddahi Ould Abdallahi Michael Bronner

    “Waiting on torture is worse than torture.”

    It’s an old Arabic proverb, quoted by Mohamedou Ould Slahi in his bestselling memoir, Guantánamo Diary, which chronicles his nearly 15 years of extralegal interrogation and detention. 

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  • Home from Guantánamo

    Mohamedou Ould Slahi Michael Bronner

    The third week of October – 14 years, two months and ten days after he arrived at Guantánamo as prisoner #760 – a US military escort team marched Mohamedou Ould Slahi through one of the last interior gates towards freedom. It was the middle of the night. The procession paused beneath the prison’s electric lights, and an officer strode up beside Mohamedou. With a straight face, he whipped out a life-sized head shot of Mohamedou, held it up next to his real-life mug and shouted: “DETAINEE IDENTITY CONFIRMED!!” 

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  • A Poem for Aleppo

    Warscapes

    Under Siege 
    by Mahmoud Darwish

     

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    Here on the slopes of hills, facing the dusk and the cannon of time 
    Close to the gardens of broken shadows, 
    We do what prisoners do, 
    And what the jobless do: 
    We cultivate hope. 

    A country preparing for dawn. We grow less intelligent 
    For we closely watch the hour of victory: 
    No night in our night lit up by the shelling 
    Our enemies are watchful and light the light for us 
    In the darkness of cellars. 

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  • Shooting Ourselves: Simulating the Dysfunctional Family of War

    Shimrit Lee

    The opening shots of Christine Cynn’s Shooting Ourselves encapsulates the jarring visual world of the arms industry. The film begins in a conference room: an empty, quiet space with greying carpet, a map of the world, and unopened water bottles on a wide table. The camera then cuts to Aleppo, the archetype of a city in ruins.

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  • The Trump-Brexit status quo and the monstrous realism of dystopia

    Michael Paye

     

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